10

Proselytizing is definitely inappropriate — but my first thought is just applying SE guidelines. If a comment isn’t helpful in clarifying the question, then flag it for removal. Just in general, content in Q+A should be as neutral point-of-view as possible. For comments this is less important. But bounds of reason apply and “be nice” ethos is in effect ...


7

Comments should not be used for answers. There are two types of situations where this tends to arise: Questions that have been closed where commentors answer in comments to express disagreement with the close. Questions with patently obvious answers. I'm probably guilty on the second which I don't see how to solve. For the first, I can see why people ...


6

From the help center: When should I comment? You should submit a comment if you want to: Request clarification from the author; Leave constructive criticism that guides the author in improving the post; Add relevant but minor or transient information to a post (e.g. a link to a related question, or an alert to the author that the question has been updated)....


5

This question is answered on Meta Meta, which is where features common to all SE are discussed. There is nothing special about 5 minutes in particular, but "if you're allowed to edit a comment for much longer than 5 minutes, it becomes possible to perform an edit on the comment that makes it out of context (no longer makes sense) with the rest of the ...


4

In addition to the two cases virmaior mentioned, I personally will on occasion leave an "answer comment" for something that's an idea for an answer, but isn't fully fleshed out. Not sure if this is a great practice, but it has these advantages: 1) Someone who is looking for something quick or a hint has a place to look that might be helpful 2) Avoids ...


4

Firstly, these are mechanisms that are deeply embedded in the StackExchange platform, so there is no way for us to handle it differently just for one site. This leads us to Meta.StackExchange - and we can see that this idea has a long history there (you should read the comments to the answers, including follow-ups, as well). In short, this has been ...


3

If the comment requires a lot of thoughts then it's better to draft it elsewhere before posting (Notepad perhaps). If it's not, then the trivial fix can be added by deleting the old comment and posting a new one.


3

I think this is a real issue in Philosophy SE. For example, in this question the correct answer is given in the comments, which leaves us without the means to upvote and provide feedback on it, that might be useful to other users. It happens all the time. One way to go would be just to copy the correct answer given in a comment into a proper answer, but I ...


2

This question isn't really about philosophy, it's about the way this website is managed. However, I agree that a 5-minute editing time is too short. I just got cut off halfway through improving the clarity of a comment, so the comment survives in a longwinded, less clear form. I guess the lesson is to write your comment offline.


2

If there is a reason for the time-restriction on editing comments, I don't know what it is. If I take 3 minutes or 30 minutes over a comment, how am I inconveniencing others ? There is no danger of more time meaning excessively long comments, because comments have a strict word limit.


2

Keelan's answer to the related question you linked to may be worth noting: Originally, comments were meant for short-term discussion in order to improve the post. They should not contain anything valuable (if it is valuable, it should be incorporated into the post), and can hence be deleted. If the comment contains a link I often add that link with ...


2

Also a newbie, but I think that applying the SE policies is sufficient. That being said, I believe that philosophy is a strong enough practice to tolerate answers such as "because God said so" within normal Socratic dialogue, without resorting to blocking and flagging and so forth. "Because God said so" is a weak answer to "why", whether or not it is in ...


1

This is a partial answer. The reason the comment section is used rather than chat is because there is a comment link, "add a comment", below each question and answer, but there is no link to "discuss in chat". It is unclear to users that there is a chat option that will tie a discussion back to a particular question or answer. Some ways to fix this ...


1

As I read other Phil.SE posts, I've seen quite a few cases where learners and students are not comfortable asserting Answers outright, but use comments to provide partial feedback and ideas for consideration .. essentially, floating "test balloons". This seems useful, and doesn't preclude an Answer later. It's also in keeping with comments as a means to ...


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