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How to formulate a question here in this site??

If I don't have questions to ask how do I find one? How to make my mind search for questions? I want to ask questions but they don't come to mind right now.

migrated from philosophy.stackexchange.com Aug 1 '18 at 4:57

This question came from our site for those interested in the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence.

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    questions about the SE and how it works belong on meta.philosophy.se ... – virmaior Jul 31 '18 at 15:25
  • If you have no questions then why would you want to find one? – rus9384 Jul 31 '18 at 15:37
  • once i was curious about everything , but somehow that curiosity seems to have vanished and what i want to do is restart it – dardani Jul 31 '18 at 16:08
  • off topic sorry – user34105 Jul 31 '18 at 17:11
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    Browse top (or new elsewhere or perhaps here ) for some ideas. If you prefer print, maybe Philosophy Now or other. Personally, I'd recommend a podcast like PEL or here or here. Questions will come once you start learning. Cheers. – BurnsBA Jul 31 '18 at 19:19
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When I first joined a Stack Exchange (SE) I thought the most important thing to do was to ask a cool question. I also found it difficult to come up with something that five other people would not want to close on me. Since then I don't think someone who is unfamiliar with an SE should ask a question (or answer one) until they become familiar with the site.

I know that won't stop inexperienced users from asking and answering questions and it doesn't bother me what such users choose to do. The more questions they ask the more edits, flags, close votes and new user reviews I can make which all counts toward the game aspect of the site.

However, suppose a new user decides to be patient and become familiar first with the site before asking or answering a question. What does familiarity mean?

I think one can measure familiarity in terms of the badges the user has. A user is familiar if the user has three, but preferably all, of the following four badges:

First, the user should have the Fanatic badge. This is a gold badge stating that the user has been to the side for 100 consecutive days. That implies patience with refraining from asking and answering questions as well as commitment.

Second, the user should have the Electorate badge. This is a gold badge stating that the user has voted on 600 questions with 25% of the votes on the question. This implies (hopefully) that the user is reading.

Third, the user should have the Commentator badge. This is a bronze badge stating that the user has commented 10 times. This seems like a trivial badge, but it implies the user is not afraid to communicate with the group.

Fourth, the user optionally should have the Strunk & White badge. This is a silver badge stating that the user has made 80 edits. Making edits is one way to get reputation points. Making 80 edits may be difficult on some sites where more experienced users do the editing more rapidly. One can include flags in that count of 80 to show familiarity with the site (although they won't help toward the badge). Basically the user should show to themselves that they are confident in themselves when they read the subject matter of an SE critically.

In the process of getting those badges the user should make lists of questions, find interesting tags and think of answers. The user should identify who the main players are and understand what good questions and answers contain.

Then the user can start asking questions (no more than one per day) and answer questions (as many as the user likes).

At least this is what I am doing now when exploring the Psychology and Neuroscience, Physics and Chemistry SE sites. I am not rushing in.

Now consider the OP's question: How to formulate a question here in this site??

Once you have the four badges listed above, you will know how to formulate a question, a good one. If not, continuing reading, voting, editing, flagging, commenting and coming back to the site until you do.

  • that is very clarifying and i will not not ask questions just for the sake of asking – dardani Aug 7 '18 at 8:42

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