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For example, I believe that the particular passage from Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers contains faulty reasoning (obviously I might be wrong):

The striking thing about Ericsson’s study is that he and his colleagues couldn’t find any “naturals,” musicians who floated effortlessly to the top while practicing a fraction of the time their peers did. Nor could they find any “grinds,” people who worked harder than everyone else, yet just didn’t have what it takes to break the top ranks.

This is what is known in economics as an endogeneity problem -- that cause and effect are reversed, and I would use that as a basis to challenge the conclusions made by the author.

Would I be able to ask questions about (faulty) reasoning and argument on this site? Or would it be more appropriate on the language, stats or a domain-specific site?

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    Your challenge as presented here is a bit opaque to me - I'm not sure what reasoning there even is in the excerpt. It just reads like two empirical statements to me. But maybe that's just my problem, and in any case, a sufficiently thought-out challenge to an established argument is usually welcome here. – commando Aug 26 '16 at 15:34
  • @commando Ah true. This empirical evidence (in itself questionable) is forwarded in the context of a thesis for which they are not valid arguments (IMHO). I have obviously gone and omitted the context. Regardless, I have my answer. – tchakravarty Aug 26 '16 at 16:38

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